Woodfinishers Weblog

Wood finishing forum for professional finishers

Graffiti removal with Monopole’s Citrus Clean Super

Graffiti has become a major scourge ruining art work and defacing property, to combat this, the field of anti-graffiti coatings has come into it’s own.

The best products I have found in this arena are the Monopole products, and the best of their line up is the Permashield Premium. Which is a product that I carry and support.

That being said, there is a special cleaner that is used with this product that will make the job of graffiti removal easy and simple. We have put together a short video of the steps to using the Citrus Clean Super #9800.

The video pretty much spells it all out, If you have questions on the product you are welcome to call me If you would like to order the product you can do so from my web site at http://www.annexpaint.com. IF you would like a copy of the technical data sheet you are welcome to email me and I’ll send you a copy.

best,
Greg Saunders
Annex Paint

March 27, 2014 Posted by | Anti Graffiti coatings, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Part II : an Intro to water based floor coatings Permashield 2000

This is a video of the application of Permashield 2000 by Monopole Inc. IT is a fast dry polyuria clear coat. The video says most every thing to say, this is a phenomenally tough coating that can be applied and then walked on in a matter if hours. This product dries in about 10 to 15 minutes so you really have to move quickly. Best application is to have a few people,  one mixing with one or two people applying the coating. This product had been used on baseball stadium concourses as well  as on heliport decks, it is very tough.

The reason that I was using it was that it is also fairly thick and so coated over the flecks that I had broad cast into the previous coating. If I were to add another coat of the permashield 2000 we would have a very slick surface

Contact me you are interested in knowing more about this or other Monopole Products.Greg Saunders

Greg Saunders
Annex Paint

January 7, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Breaking tradition: an Intro to water based epoxy floor coatings

While this is a wood finishing blog I recently had to do a remodeling job for a new office and had a concrete floor to cover and make look good. Having been a supplier for the monopole line of water based concrete coatings  I decided to use my own products and make a training video out of the event.

The Product I’m using is a 2 component water based epoxy that will stick to anything and as well is inexpensive and USDA approved for food service areas. While I had shot blasted the floor to really clean it that was some what unnecessary with this product as it will adhere to any clean surface including porcelain tile.  That is good, really good if you need to put a coating down on a floor that you can’t shot  blast.

The down side to this product is that it has a 20-30 minute pot life, that means that you have that amount of time before it starts hardening up on you in the can, yup, that’s right 20-30 minutes. Mix this up and go to lunch and when you return you’ll have a door stop in your bucket. factually it won’t solidify that quickly but you will have wasted that material as it will be beyond use.

While the video, videography, production of this is about as good as terrible I’m posting it any way as there is a lot of instructional data that you should have if you are going to use this product.   My goal being to give you and my customers a fighting chance at getting it right the first time.

So once again please excuse the videography there are spots where the camera person zoomed in and left it out of focus. If you can over look these things I hope that you find the posting useful.

Further note on this product: epoxies are great primers and are very hard and this one is one of the best, that being said, epoxies will “chalk” up in the sun light so you don’t what to have and epoxy in the direct Sun light, if you need to use and epoxy primer to get your top coat to stick then top coat the epoxy with another product, in the industry urethanes are generally used over the epoxies heavy equipment painting, tractors  oil rigs, farm equipment and things of that nature are generally primed with and epoxy and then top coated with a polyurethane. the polyurethane is UV stable and will not fade in the sun light and the epoxy is the hard tough protective coating. The “Chalking” doesn’t effect the integrity of the coating just the look. So this application is in side a garage and will have little to no sunlight.

The real trick with this product is getting it mixed and applied quickly. For my application we also applied a color sprinkle to give the floor a little depth and quality. so for this we would coat a section of the floor and then sprinkle in the colored flakes and then move on to do another section.

In the next video we applied the top coat of permashield 2000 and that is another fast dry product that cures very fast.

You are welcome to contact me with questions on this product and others.

In the next video we’ll do the top coat.

Best,

Greg Saunders
Annex Paint

January 7, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to finish a wooden sink bowl

This is an interesting one that I thought I would share. A furniture designer from Lithuania wrote to me  asking for help with a wooden sink bowl. I have no pictures to share on this one but after I composed the reply I thought there were a few things in the reply that wood finishers would appreciate.

I have changed the original message from the designed only slightly to protect his identity.

Hello,

My name is Tomas, I am an independent furniture designer. 
Currently I have an order to produce a wooden bathroom sink and it seems that you have some products that could assist me in doing this.
Could you recommend a varnish for such a job (the only requirement is that the varnish needs to be glossy)? From what I understand, the varnish, that would be suitable for a wooden sink, must be hot water-resistant, it also needs to seal the pores of wood well. 
If you have a suitable project, how much water does it let through? Are there any special varnishing techniques? 
Do you have a sales representative in Lithuania? 

Thank you in advance!

Hi Tomas,

Thanks for your inquire; There are two routes to go with a project like this. the first is to use a “food-grade” oil for the proposed sink and instruct the customer that they will have to oil it regularly. This is the sort of coating you have on wooden salid  bowls.
 
For something like that you would have to design it in such a way that it was completely sealed on the bottom and in the drain hole as anywhere you have a penetration or where water is going to collect it is eventually going to make its way into the wood and begin to rot the wood. As a note, I would design the bowl in such away so as to be sure that it doesn’t ever sit in water. For example have it on a metal or plastic pedestal so that any water on the sink counter drains off of it. Standing water will be the enemy you’ll have to overcome.
 
The next problem that you’ll have to overcome is getting a coating that is hard enough to withstand the abuse that a sink will get and yet soft enough to expand and contract with temperature changes.
 
For note: I would never warrantee something like that as the moment someone drops something sharp in the bowl and penetrates the coating you are going to have a place where water is going to eventually seep in and then lift you coating.

The next thing to consider is the wood you are going to use. Ideally I would use the hardest wood you can find; epay or iron wood.

All of the above being said I would then suggest the CIC two component water based urethane.  Or the Permashield 200 from monopole both of these products are good the Permashield 200 is a product that is approved for food servicing areas by the US department of Agriculture (USDA). Both of these you can find on my web site at : www.annexpaint.com

In terms of special application procedures for this application. I would do several things; once the bowl was ready for finishing I would wet it with warm water just making it slightly damp. As you are using a water based product this will not react badly with the coating and in fact what it will do is lower the surface tension of the wood which will allow the coating to soak into all the grain pores. Next I would put down several light coats of the polyurethane that are thinned down as much as recommended and as well heated to about 100 degrees Fahrenheit. This will further reduce the viscosity and allow it to soak in as much as possible. Repeat the coating  with a light but thorough sanding in-between coats as many time necessary to achieve the build you want but with a minimum of  4 of 5 coats. Only the first or second coat need the additional reduction, the purpose of this is to achieve maximum penetration into the wood. Lastly I would let it cure for three weeks to ensure that it has reached its maximum hardness before giving it to the customer.

I’m sorry I don’t have a rep in Lithuania but if you would like to fly me over I would love to come. I haven’t shipped material overseas as it is rather coast prohibitive for customers.

The two companies who might have a suitable product are Renner and Icsam  they are both Italian and have very good materials.

Best,

  Greg Saunders

 Cell:      818-439-9297
Office:  818-344-3000
Fax:      818-344-3994

greg@annexpaint.com

www.annexpaint.com

I wonder if my boss would fly me to Lithuania?? 

 

January 11, 2012 Posted by | polyurethane, Spray techniques, Tips and Tricks, Water based Lacquers, Wood finishing | , , , , , , | Leave a comment